Shady Oaks

All Monsters and Dust

Posts tagged food

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Graze

So I just signed up for a thing called Graze; looks like all natural snacks sent right to your mailbox for 5 bucks a week!

I thought, well shit. I love to snack and I probably spend about that much on snacks that aren’t too good for me…let’s give it a shot!

I thought mah moris might enjoy it too. You need the invite code to join, so go ahead and use mine! 

Filed under Graze food snacks healthy natural mori girl treats

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Bizarre Victorian fact of the day…

victorianfanguide:

Jellies and ices were the most popular dessert dishes of the Victorian period. They took great skill to make and were the crowning glory of the dinner table emphasising the host’s wealth and status. Elaborate moulds were used to create jellies and ices in impressive towering forms, especially castles, some of which allowed the turrets to be filled with decorative spirals of cream. As a young girl Queen Victoria was particularly impressed by a jelly in the form the Temple of Solomon with each tower decorated with a sprig of flowers. Victorian chefs used a variety of innovative methods to keep their dishes cool. These included using decorative meringues as covers for ice creams (some made to look like a beehive covered with bees made of pistachio nuts for the body, currants for the head and almonds for the wings) or using sculpted ice as a stand for the pudding.

The Victoria Pudding, created by the Queen’s chef Charles Elme Francatelli, was an iced pudding flavoured with ginger comfits and preserved pineapple which was served on an ice stand sculpted in the shape of two entwined dolphins with a garnish of seaweed made from gum paste. Nesselrode Pudding was the most popular iced pudding of the Victorian period and contained egg yolks, powdered sugar, vanilla, double cream, chestnuts poached in syrup, currants, raisins and maraschino cherry liquor. Ice cream ‘bombes’ were also extremely popular, especially towards the end of the 19th century. In reference to the increase in anarchist activity during this period ice cream bombe moulds were created to make ices look like bombs or grenades with spun sugar as the flames.

Filed under 19th century history victorian food confectionery dessert pudding ice cream jelly queen victoria cooking ingredients britain british decoration anarchism

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vicfangirlguide:

‘The Christmas Hamper’ by Robert Braithwaite Martineau. One of the most important parts of Christmas Day during the Victorian period was the Christmas meal. Goose was the desirable main dish and many poor people joined ‘Goose Clubs’ where they would pay a certain amount a week to be able to afford at least a part of a goose for their Christmas meal.
People also joined ‘Pudding Clubs’. Christmas pudding (also known as plum or figgy pudding) was the highlight of the Christmas meal. Traditionally Christmas puddings are made with a mixture of suet, breadcrumbs, fruit, nuts, spices and beer. Items were also added to the pudding which would predict the fortune of the person who received them in their portion at Christmas dinner. These items varied depending on the household but commonly included a coin (a thruppence or sixpence) which foretold wealth for the coming year, a wishbone for good luck and a thimble indicating a year without marriage prospects. As in the Victorian period it is still a tradition in Britain that the Christmas Pudding is brought to the dinner table doused in brandy and set alight with a sprig of holly in its centre.

vicfangirlguide:

‘The Christmas Hamper’ by Robert Braithwaite Martineau. One of the most important parts of Christmas Day during the Victorian period was the Christmas meal. Goose was the desirable main dish and many poor people joined ‘Goose Clubs’ where they would pay a certain amount a week to be able to afford at least a part of a goose for their Christmas meal.

People also joined ‘Pudding Clubs’. Christmas pudding (also known as plum or figgy pudding) was the highlight of the Christmas meal. Traditionally Christmas puddings are made with a mixture of suet, breadcrumbs, fruit, nuts, spices and beer. Items were also added to the pudding which would predict the fortune of the person who received them in their portion at Christmas dinner. These items varied depending on the household but commonly included a coin (a thruppence or sixpence) which foretold wealth for the coming year, a wishbone for good luck and a thimble indicating a year without marriage prospects. As in the Victorian period it is still a tradition in Britain that the Christmas Pudding is brought to the dinner table doused in brandy and set alight with a sprig of holly in its centre.

(via victorianfanguide)

Filed under 19th century history victorian christmas chirstmas pudding food painting household cooking dinner meal recipe superstition britain british