Shady Oaks

All Monsters and Dust

Posts tagged 18th century

285 notes

ornamentedbeing:

Emile Pingat (1820–1901), Paris, Skirt and polonaise, 1885. Velvet, beads, silk, glass. Collection of Shelburne Museum. 2010-75

“Emile Pingat has taken a page from the 18th century, adapting a classical men’s court ensemble and feminizing it. Instead of breeches that match the coat, there is a long velvet skirt finished with a ruffle. The apparent waistcoat is not a separate garment but instead is constructed as two decorative panels set into the coat. Pingat has updated the style and beauty of aristocratic men’s clothing by adding the small pointed zigzag motif in the embroidery. This one-of-a-kind colonial revival style dress would have been worn to a ball or masquerade with appropriate accessories that could have included a wig, fan, and shoes.

Filed under pingat victorian fancy dress colonial costume masquerade red fashion art beauty crazy 18th century steampunk neo-victorian embroidery

420 notes

vivelareine:

One of the early amusements designed for Marie Antoinette and her guests at the Petit Trianon was a Chinese pavilion which housed a moving merry-go-round that operated through an invisible mechanism underneath the structure. The queen and her courtiers would sit astride expertly carved Chinoiserie-styled animals, such as fanciful dragons and plumed peacocks. Both the pavilion and merry-go-around were likely dismantled during the revolution.

Filed under marie antoinette history 18th century merry go round carousel

64 notes

vivelareine:

Half-fainting, half-struggling, the terrified woman had to be carried down from the cart and helped up the steps to the scaffold. Because of her almost-hysterical condition it was decided that she should be the first to be executed.

Despite the cold and gathering darkness a sizable crowd had gathered about the scaffold, among them no doubt Greive, Zamore and Salanave. In the terror of her last minutes she probably did not see them. If she saw anything it would have been the gardens of the Tuileries or perhaps the dim outlines of the Louvre, visible above the bare trees of the park. When the executioner and his assistant seized her in order that she might be bound to the fatal plank she was heard to cry out:—“You are going to hurt me! Oh, please don’t hurt me!”

—Du Barry: A Biography by Stanley Loomis

image: Madame du Barry (1919)

Filed under madame du barry french revolution history silent films 18th century gifs film

179 notes

oldrags:

Robe, 1780-85 France, the Victoria & Albert Museum

This gown demonstrates the fashionable styles in women’s formal dress of the 1780s. The hoop has changed from the square shape of earlier decades to a round profile. A stomacher is no longer needed, because the gown now meets in the front. The cream silk is adorned only at the edges with an embroidered band, ribbon and a stencilled fringe. This restraint in decoration illustrates the growing influence of the Neo-classical style in textile design.

oldrags:

Robe, 1780-85 France, the Victoria & Albert Museum

This gown demonstrates the fashionable styles in women’s formal dress of the 1780s. The hoop has changed from the square shape of earlier decades to a round profile. A stomacher is no longer needed, because the gown now meets in the front. The cream silk is adorned only at the edges with an embroidered band, ribbon and a stencilled fringe. This restraint in decoration illustrates the growing influence of the Neo-classical style in textile design.

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Filed under photo france 1780's 18th century 1780 1781 1782 1783 1784 1785

47 notes

oldrags:

Robe, 1795-1800 England, the Victoria & Albert Museum

The cotton weaving and printing industries in Britain expanded greatly during the period 1775-1800. Cotton was a very popular fabric for clothing, from sheer muslins to heavy corduroys. It was part of the wardrobe of all classes. This printed cotton gown of the late 1790s could have been the Sunday best of a working-class woman or the informal morning gown of a wealthy lady. The very high waist and long sleeves are the typical fashion of this period.

oldrags:

Robe, 1795-1800 England, the Victoria & Albert Museum

The cotton weaving and printing industries in Britain expanded greatly during the period 1775-1800. Cotton was a very popular fabric for clothing, from sheer muslins to heavy corduroys. It was part of the wardrobe of all classes. This printed cotton gown of the late 1790s could have been the Sunday best of a working-class woman or the informal morning gown of a wealthy lady. The very high waist and long sleeves are the typical fashion of this period.

Filed under photo UK empire 1790's 1800's 18th century 19th century 1795 1796 1797 1798 1799 1800